The HASI

  • A screening test, not a diagnostic test for intellectual disability
  • Can be administered by non-psychologists in 5 -10 minutes.
  • Correctly screens for intellectual disability in 82% of cases and correctly excludes non-disabled clients in 72% of cases.
  • Correlates significantly with standardised tests of cognition and adaptive behaviour.
  • Is culture and gender fair.
  • Saves valuable time and resources.
  • The score indicates "Refer for further assessment"or "No referral"
  • Administered individually, not in a group
  • Covers a wide age range – 13 to adulthood
  • Can be used with victims/complainants or offenders as a screening test
  • Suitable for use by probation and parole personnel, police, solicitors and barristers, corrective services staff, juvenile justice workers, alcohol andother drug counsellors, forensic and correctional mental health professionals

The HASI is widely used in Australia and also in the UK, USA, Canada, Norway and The Netherlands.

It has been translated into Norwegian, Dutch and Canadian French.

It is a unique and effective instrument to screen for intellectual disability.

Purpose and Use of the HASI

The Hayes Ability Screening Index (HASI) is a brief, individually administered screening index of intellectual abilities. The HASI is intended for use with people aged between 13 and late adulthood. It was developed primarily to provide a short and effective instrument to indicate the possible presence of intellectual disability amongst persons in contact with the criminal justice system and to determine those who need to be referred for further full-scale diagnostic assessment. In police settings, the Index is designed to identify those accused persons who may be vulnerable during detention or police interviews, so that appropriate provisions for vulnerable suspects may be implemented.

The Index correctly identifies 82 per cent of clients with an intellectual disability (as assessed on a standard test of intelligence), who need a full-scale assessment, whilst correctly excluding 72 per cent of non-disabled clients from further psychometric assessment. Furthermore, the HASI correlates significantly with standardised tests of intelligence and adaptive behaviour.

The HASI, therefore, can assist police, corrective services, juvenile justice services, probation and parole services and lawyers in the most effective utilisation of psychological and mental health resources.

From Research to Policy and Practice - Changes for Offenders with an Intellectual Disability (Word)
From Research to Policy and Practice (Powerpoint)
11th International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities World Congress
1-6 August, 2000
Seattle, Washington

Early Intervention or Early Incarceration? (Word)
Early Intervention or Early Incarceration? (Powerpoint)
11th International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities World Congress
1-6 August, 2000
Seattle, Washington

The relationship between intellectual disability, mental illness and socioeconomic factors amongst defendants appearing before NSW Local Courts (PDF)
The relationship between intellectual disability, mental illness and socioeconomic factors amongst defendants appearing before NSW Local Courts
Australian Community Support Organisation 4th Forensic Disabilities Conference - "Disability and Justice: Many faces, equal rights?"
16-17 July 2009, Melbourne